Bow Wall

Crag Description

The Bow Wall was developed for climbing in 2002 and was found as a result of persistent efforts by Steven Punshon. The cliff is not extensive but is up to fourteen metres high and is dominated by a very striking prow. All the routes here are of decent quality and many of the lines require a committed leader. However, all routes are also easily top-roped.

The cliff dries quickly as it faces southeast and catches a lot of sun. There’s very little wind here so expect to get eaten alive during bug season. From the top you can see Main Face, First Face and Columbus.

How to get there

The approach is along the gated logging road that passes Columbus Wall. From the gate, follow the road for 5.7 km keeping left at a couple of forks, to a small clearing north of Sugar Camp Lake (park near a cairn on the right hand side of the road). It’s about an hour hike to here, but this could be made easier by mountain bike, or much easier by vehicle if you have a key to the gate (for a key, contact Taylor Lumber, Middle Musquodoboit, $75/year). From the clearing, hike for about 300m east along the rough road, then keep right along a flagged trail for another 200 m to the crag (15 minutes from the road).

Routes

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So called because it avoids the alluring direct start and finish. From a spruce tree on a dirty ledge, move rightwards along a ramp, then follow the vague crackline until it is possible to traverse right to a crack in a nose. Move up and back left to finish. Originally cleaned and top-roped by McVey and Parker.
Type:Trad
Height:10m
Rating:PG
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:September 8, 2002
The deep V-notch dihedral that is capped by an angled roof. Move left slightly at the roof and then back right to exit the dihedral, finishing on the slab above. Funkier than it looks inside the dihedral and a little stiff for the grade.
Type:Trad
Height:10m
Rating:PG
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:October 6, 2002
The dihedral that leads to an offwidth crack at the halfway point. Easier than it looks, but still a fairly serious undertaking considering the grade. [Note: there is good gear at the start and near the end of the offwidth, but nothing in between. Surprisingly positive holds in here though.]
Type:Trad
Height:10m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:September 8, 2002
Start five metres left of the main crackline where a detached flake forms a short chimney. Move up and left to gain left-facing flakes up to a horizontal and then to a hollow-sounding ear-shaped flake. Using a small hold above, make a hard move right to a good flake and then finish on Lost Arrow. Very strenuous and sustained.
Type:Trad
Height:14m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:August 18, 2002
The obvious line. Just amazing. Good gear, good moves, consistent difficulty. Quality climbing at a reasonable grade.
Type:Trad
Height:12m
Rating:G
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:August 2, 2002
Start as per Lost Arrow and then cut right along the ramp to gain the arête (crux). Move up to a good incut with a small horn. Sling the horn (this is your only "piece" for the next five metres) and continue on positive edges and improving holds up to the top. A small friend can protect the top-out. Sparsely protected.
Type:Trad
Height:13m
Rating:R
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:August 18, 2002
Climb the blank-looking face, beginning with an incipient right-trending seam. Step left into a bowl and then straight up past a couple of small overlaps. Not much gear on this one at all.
Type:Trad
Height:7m
Rating:R
FA by:Steve Punshon
FA on:September 8, 2002
Climb the triangular-shaped dihedral on the right side of the buttress past a hollow-sounding flake. Step left to finish.
Type:Trad
Height:7m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Peter McVey
FA on:August 18, 2002