Easter Island

Crag Description

This small crag was stumbled upon by intrepid explorers Steve Brewis and Colin Matthews in early 1995.  (Note: this is not actually an island) As legend has it, they were looking for Crow’s Nest, unwittingly got directions for Sorrow’s End, but drove too far, only to find a new cliff rising from the sea. After scrubbing the most obvious line, which appeared hardest routes here – and at 23 metres, the longest. The name “Easter Island” was coined later after people noticed the presence of two headstones (or Ahu) visible from the top of the crag. When there’s a strong sea breeze, this area is excellent for climbing in June when the blackflies make climbing elsewhere unbearable. A standard climbing rack is required for all routes and belay stations.

How to get there

Originally, this climbing area was accessed from the end of “Nice View Road”, but due to increasing concerns about privacy, the local residents have discouraged access to this PRIVATE road – DO NOT USE IT. An alternate, and far more scenic approach, is to paddle or sale to the cliff, which rises out of the water of Back Bay. From Highway 333, drive 9.2km on the Terrence Bay Road, passing a school and church on the left hand side. Approximately 1.3km past the church on the right hand side of the road is a great place to launch boats from. Put in here and paddle approximately 2 km northwest into the sheltered Back Bay until you reach the cliff, about 200m west of the last house in the bay.

Note: The cliff is on an undeveloped piece of private land. To date there have bee no issues with people climbing there if arriving by boat. However, it is likely that a building lot will be developed here in the future, and may affect climbing access. If the site becomes inhabited, be sure to ask permission prior to climbing.

Routes

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The sound that Tigger makes. A short but enjoyable romp at the far left end of the crag, on a small buttress separated from the main cliff. To be a legitimate ascent, the aspiring climber must accurately pronounce the route's name three times.
Type:Trad
Height:6m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Dave Edgell
FA on:Spring 1996
Angle up and right along an unprotected and awkward layback (5.9) until you are below a short roof. Pull the well-protected roof (crux) and continue up the excellent crack that widens from small fingers to perfect hand jams. During the first ascent, a bat chirped in protest from within the crack, staking its territory. It is possible to avoid the crux roof and the bat by scooting to your right and finishing on Shoe Sacrifice.
Type:Trad
Height:10m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Sean Cassidy
FA on:June 1996
Fire up the short dihedral and make an interesting move (5.7) onto the easy slab. On the first ascent, Tony dove into the wide crack which heads up the right-most wall (5.9). Other options include: heading up the right-leaning, slightly overhanging dihedral a little farther up (5.8+) or following the stunning finish to Shoe Sacrifice (which makes an easier and very enjoyable route, 5.7).
Type:Trad
Height:15m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Tony Windust
FA on:Spring 1995
Start up the wide layback in a corner, three metres right of Flaming Sausages, and onto the slab, passing two possible exits on your right. Move left delicately around a corner and up twin cracks to the top. Excellent route. Apparently, J.P. lost a pair of new rock shoes to the tide while he was climbing this one.
Type:Trad
Height:15m
Rating:G
FA by:J.P. Brown
FA on:Summer 1995
A challenging route with a wide variety of moves, starting left of the Oh, I See! slab. Karate chop the wide left-leaning crack and shimmy up and left towards the inside corner, passing a tree on your way. From the corner, stealth your way out left and around the arete to a precarious stance where better protection is available. Smooth your way up and left along the thin crack until you can dive into the wide crack, which was the original finish to Flaming Sausages. A few more chops and you're up - you are now a black belt! This route was named after a cool song by the Superfriendz. It cannot be climbed at high tide.
Type:Trad
Height:17m
Rating:G
FA by:Sean Cassidy
FA on:June 1996
An interesting and sometimes intense slab climb. Traverse left along the slab (above the water) to gain small holds leading upwards. Step across the chasm of doom onto the upper slab where protection awaits in the vegetated crack. Easily top-roped.
Type:Trad
Height:15m
Rating:PG-
FA by:Dave Edgell
FA on:Summer 1995
A variation to Oh, I See!, which starts by assaulting the bush-choked corner just to the right of the initial slab. Wrestle past a birch tree and gain the upper slab via the thin crack, whereupon you join the original route.
Type:Trad
Height:15m
Rating:PG
FA by:Bob Scheibling
FA on:Summer 1996
A short but enjoyable climb which feels a lot longer than it is. Start on the bushy ledge at the top of the descent trail and scamper up the near-horizontal ledges and into a vertical crack. The name was born when Dave took flight after a foot-hold broke. Other than that hold, the route is quite solid.
Type:Trad
Height:6m
Rating:G
FA by:Dave Edgell
FA on:June 1996